CARA in the Media


15 June 2014
Huffington Post
Why Does Our Collective Empathy So Often Fail to Manifest in Our Treatment of Refugees? by Shami Chakrabarti

The treatment of refugees is still done with ignorance and even contempt. Why does our collective empathy so often fail to manifest in our treatment of such a vulnerable group? Perhaps it is our perception of geographical distance and a preference for avoiding the horrible things that happen far away. 

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10 December 2013
Times Higher Education (THE)
Academics urged to do more on human rights by Matthew Reisz

A leading activist has called on the academic community to do far more “to help promote and defend human rights”.

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05 December 2013
Times Higher Education (THE)
Autonomy the best defence for universities under attack by Matthew Reisz

Global coalition advocates ‘insulation’ against state and non-state actors. A major report makes the case for “autonomy” as an essential protection to “insulate higher education from politicization and ideological manipulation” and “safeguard…institutions and personnel against attack by state and non-state actors”.

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21 November 2013
The Bucks Herald
Guttmann inducted into athletics hall of fame

Sir Ludwig Guttmann, the Stoke Mandeville Hospital doctor who founded the Paralympic Games, has been inducted into the England Athletics Hall of Fame.

 The legendary professor, who died in 1980 aged 80, was one of just nine people honoured at Birmingham’s NEC for their outstanding contribution to athletics.

The induction award for Sir Ludwig - a Hall of Fame trophy - was presented to his daughter Eva Loeffler by BBC commentator Paul Dickenson.

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19 November 2013
Bucks Free Press
National honour for Paralympics founder

The Bucks doctor who became the founding father of the Paralympic Games has been honoured in the England Athletics Hall of Fame.

Sir Ludwig ‘Poppa’ Guttmann, the Stoke Mandeville doctor, who died in 1980 aged 80, was one of just nine people honoured at Birmingham’s NEC last month for their outstanding contribution to athletics. 

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07 November 2013
Inside Higher Ed
Arab (Science) Spring? by MATTHEW REISZ for THE

One of Britain's leading physicists will urge the countries of the Arab world to address "a general apathy towards science and freedom of thinking" -- a mood he believes is far too prevalent in the region.

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07 November 2013
Times Higher Education
Jim Al-Khalili calls for scientific Arab Spring by MATTHEW REISZ

In CARA lecture, Iraqi-born physicist calls for revival of region’s thirst for knowledge. 

One of the UK’s leading physicists will urge the countries of the Arab world to address “a general apathy towards science and freedom of thinking” – a mood he believes is far too prevalent in the region.

On 7 November, Jim Al-Khalili, professor of physics and public engagement in science at the University of Surrey, will deliver the inaugural Science and Civilisation lecture, launched this year by the Council for Assisting Refugee Academics in celebration of its 80th anniversary and planned as an annual event. The address will offer his “personal and historical perspective” on “Science, Rationalism and Academic Freedom in the Arab World”.

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25 October 2013
Association of Jewish Refugees
AJR plaque to honour Sir Ludwig Guttmann

We were delighted to unveil a plaque dedicated to Sir Ludwig Guttmann at a special event at the National Spinal Injuries Centre (NSIC) part of Stoke Mandeville hospital on Thursday 24 October.

Sir Ludwig is now widely known as the founder of the Paralympics having fled Nazi Germany and found refuge in Britain in March 1939. His escape was made possible by the Society for the Protection of Science and Learning (now succeeded by the Council for Assisting Refugee Academics) which was responsible in the 1930s for finding posts for a large number of refugee academics and scientists, mostly Jewish, who had been dismissed from their positions by the Nazis.

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25 October 2013
The Bucks Herald
Plaque honouring Guttmann unveiled at Stoke Mandeville Hospital

A plaque to honour Sir Ludwig Guttmann was unveiled yesterday (Thursday) at Stoke Mandeville Hospital by Bucks Healthcare NHS Trust and the Association for Jewish Refugees.

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31 August 2013
Paralympic Movement
London 2012 brought Sir Ludwig Guttmann’s dreams to life

Eva Loeffler has been attending the Paralympic Games since she was born.

Now 79, the daughter of the deceased Sir Ludwig Guttmann, founder of the Paralympic Movement, served as the Mayor of the Paralympic Village at London 2012, which opened exactly one year ago from Thursday (29 August).

“As Mayor of the Paralympic Village, I had an amazing time greeting the athletes from 166 countries to the London Games,” Loeffler said.

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30 August 2013
Society for General Microbiology
CARA - then and now by Alan McCarthy & Paul Broda

This year, the Council for Assisting Refugee Academics (CARA) marks the 80th anniversary of its inception. William Beveridge, Ernest Rutherford, A.V. Hill and others founded the council in May 1933, and Albert Einstein’s lecture on academic freedom...

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30 July 2013
The Conversation
‘Where we used to go to teach … the armed men take us to torture us’ by Kate Robertson

We’re stranded here in Syria with our fears, losses and disappointments. Together we face an uncertain future. Everywhere you go people are suffering and mourning, especially the young academics and students who have lost all hope of a better life. Their motivation has been replaced by a total sense of helplessness and despair.

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17 July 2013
BBC News
The scientists who escaped the Nazis by Sean Coughlan

When Gustav Born's family were advised in early 1933 that it was time to leave Nazi-controlled Germany, it was from a good authority. The advice was from Albert Einstein, who told his friend and fellow scientist Max Born to "leave immediately" with his family while they were still able to travel.

They packed their bags and headed across the border, first to Italy and then to England, where they arrived as part of what must have been the best-qualified refugee trail in history.

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14 June 2013
Middle East Monitor
As the violence in Syria continues, increasing numbers of academics seek refuge in the UK by Amelia Smith

Whilst thousands of Syrians have escaped this destruction and fled across the border to seek refuge in neighbouring countries, some are currently living in exile in the UK.

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13 June 2013
LSE Connect
No-one chooses to be a refugee by Latefa Guemar

Latefa Guemar is no ordinary fellow. She is part of the Scholars at Risk scheme and a visiting fellow in the Gender Institute at LSE. Here she tells her story.

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13 June 2013
THE
Shelter from the Storm, happy birthday CARA by Matthew Reisz

House of Lords event hears how council and the scholars it has saved have enriched the UK.

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09 June 2013
The New York Times
A British Haven for Academic Refugees by D. D. Guttenplan

CARA marks its 80th anniversary with continued determination to rescue persecuted academics.

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04 June 2013
London Evening Standard
Syrian academics ‘must be helped just like those who fled the Nazis’ by Anna Davis

UCL Provost says British universities have duty to to help academics fleeing persecution.

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31 May 2013
Financial Times
Syrian academics seek refuge at UK universities by Helen Warrell

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27 April 2013
University World News
Helping academics under threat for 80 years by David Zimmerman

Eighty years ago last month, the German government began dismissing university professors and staff for racial and political reasons. William Beveridge, director of the London School of Economics, decided to organise the British academic community to ‘temporarily’ assist the misplaced scholars.

Beveridge later described what followed as “the spontaneous uprising of British universities against learning directed by Hitler and his imitators”. In May, with the backing of the Royal Society, the Academic Assistance Council (AAC) was formed. 

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17 February 2013
La Vanguardia
Refugio del conocimiento by Angeles Rodenas

Established 80 years ago in London, the Council for Assisting Refugee Academics (CARA), was setup to serve academics fleeing the Nazis. Since then, refugee academics from many countries have been helped by this organisation helping to rebuild academic careers in exile.

Article in Spanish

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24 January 2013
The Guardian
We are doing all we can for Syrian students by CARA Letter

We are concerned at the media reports alleging Syrian students are being expelled by their UK universities to face imminent deportation and death, because they can no longer pay their fees (Syrian students in UK 'facing deportation' as funds dry up, 21 January). It's true that many of the approximately 650 Syrian students and academics studying in the UK are facing great difficulty because their funding from Syrian sources has been cut off, in addition to the daily anguish with regard to the safety of their families and friends.

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10 January 2013
Times Higher Education
Interview - Cara's long embrace of a saviour of Africa by David Matthews

Anti-apartheid campaigner Albie Sachs has twice received a lifeline, writes David Matthews

Albie Sachs' extraordinary life story is well known across the world: a legal scholar who campaigned against apartheid, in 1988 he lost an arm and the sight in one eye as a result of a bomb planted by South African security forces.

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09 January 2013
SARUA
Virtual Lectures to help cope with brain drain

The Virtual Lecture Hall was launched at the University of Zimbabwe's College of Health Science by the UK based Council for Assisting Refugee Academics...

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04 December 2012
Society for General Microbiology Magazine
Success for SGM CARA Grant Recipient by Microbiology Today

Supporting professional development of microbiologists is one of the core strands of SGM strategy and, in 2011, Council decided to add a new dimension to this by offering sponsorship to the Council for Assisting Refugee Academics (CARA).

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13 September 2012
Jewish News
We Done Gutt! by Justin Cohen

THE government this week praised the Jewish News' "tremendous" campaign for a permanent tribute to Paralympics founder Sir Ludwig Guttmann after announcing that a new National Health Service centre at the Olympic Park site is to bear his name.

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09 September 2012
Association of Jewish Refugees Journal
Founder of the Paralympic Games by Anthony Grenville

On 4 July 2012, a reception was held at the Attlee Room in the House of Lords to celebrate the life of Sir Ludwig Guttmann, founder of the Paralympic Games, whose pioneering wartime work with victims of spinal injuries at Stoke Mandeville Hospital, Aylesbury, revolutionised the treatment of members of the forces whose wounds would previously have left them bedridden and condemned to an early death.

Guttmann’s methods were subsequently applied to paraplegics everywhere. Fittingly, the reception took place under the auspices of the Council for Assisting Refugee Academics (CARA), the successor organisation to the Society for the Protection of Science and Learning (SPSL), which was responsible in the 1930s for finding posts for a large number of refugee academics and scientists, mostly Jewish, who had been dismissed from their positions by the Nazis.

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06 September 2012
Oxford Mail
Oxford's part in the birth of the Paralympics by Fran Bardsley

Paralympic fervour has gripped the nation, putting the name of its founder, Sir Ludwig Guttmann, into the spotlight.

But were it not for a charity that helped refugee academics flee Nazi Germany and a welcome from the people of Oxford, he might never have had the chance to create the inspirational event.

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31 August 2012
The Guardian Higher Education Network
'My hope is to contribute to this county - if I'm given the opportunity by Latefa Guemar

Building an academic career is difficult but for Latefa Guemar who had arrived in the UK as a refugee, success is about so much more than making tenure. She tells the Guardian her story.

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29 August 2012
The Royal Society
Olympians and demon bowlers by Rupert Baker

Did you know that the Paralympic Games were founded by a Fellow of the Royal Society? This article tells his story, and looks at how scientists’ sporting passions have influenced their lives outside academic research, leading to an Olympic medal and the invention of a fiendish bowling machine …

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23 August 2012
Times Higher Educational Supplement
Things fells apart but centre holds hope for Zimbabwe students by Matthew Reisz

One Friday in June, Laura Broadhurst sat in a studio in central London that was linked by satellite to the University of Zimbabwe....

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16 August 2012
Evening Standard
Charity honoured for saving ‘father’ of Paralympics

Londoner Laura Broadhurst who works for a charity that helped rescue the founding father of the Paralympics from the Nazis is one of nearly 600 people who will carry the torch next week.

Jewish neurosurgeon Ludwig Guttmann fled to Britain in 1939 to escape Hitler after defying laws that prevented him from treating non-Jews.

With the support of a grant from the Council for Assisting Refugee Academics, he took up a research post in Oxford before helping to set up the National Spinal Injury Centre at Stoke Mandeville.

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16 August 2012
Radio Times
Meet Ludwig Guttmann - the Jewish doctor who fled Nazi Germany to set up the Paralympic Games by Garry Jenkins

Eva Loeffler doesn’t remember her father being the most gifted of sportsmen. “He wasn’t an athletic man. He was a short, stocky chap. He couldn’t swim and he couldn’t even ride a bicycle. I remember him cycling into a brick wall and announcing, ‘That’s it’,” she recalls with an affectionate laugh.

And yet you could argue that her father, Professor Ludwig Guttmann, had a more profound effect on sport than anyone else in the 20th century. Nicknamed “Poppa”, he is regarded as the father of the Paralympics. Without his blend of vision, energy and sheer bloody-mindedness, London might not be welcoming the world’s greatest disabled athletes to the Olympic Park on 29 August.

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16 August 2012
Evening Standard
'We want next generation of Nobel Prize winners coming to Britain,' says immigration minister by Nicholas Cecil

The Political Interview: Nicholas Cecil talks to immigration minister Damian Green. 

The visa system must be improved to encourage the most talented artists, musicians and scientists to make a life in Britain, immigration minister Damian Green said today.

He admitted a flagship visa scheme needed “fine tuning” to attract the exceptionally talented.

“If you are a current Nobel Prize winner, you won’t find it very difficult to get into this country,” he said. “But we want the next generation of Nobel Prize winners, so we have carved out a specific route in the immigration system.”

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23 July 2012
Sci Dev Net
'Virtual Lectures' to help cope with Zimbabwe brain drain by Andrew Mambondiyani

A Virtual Lecture Hall, enabling lectures to be streamed to university campuses around the world, aims to plug the gap in scientific teaching staff at the University of Zimbabwe...

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30 June 2012
The Zimbabwean
Virtual Lecture Hall links UZ to the world by Steve Eldon Kerr

The Council for Assisting Refugee Academics (CARA) and Econet Wireless officially launched a new Virtual Lecture Hall (VLH) at the University of Zimbabwe on Friday morning.....

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24 June 2012
Channel 4 News
SUNDAY 24 JUNE 2012 UK Paralympics founder Sir Ludwig Guttmann honoured by Katie Razzall

On Sunday, outside Stoke Mandeville Hospital's stadium, a statue will be unveiled of Sir Ludwig Guttmann, a man you're likely to hear more and more about as we get closer to the Paralympics.

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23 December 2011
The Guardian
Keeping the torch alight: In Defence of Learning edited by Shula Marks et al - review by Stefan Collini

In April 1933, Sir William Beveridge, then the director of the LSE, was visiting Vienna when the newspapers reported the wave of dismissals of Jewish professors from German and Austrian universities that immediately followed the enactment of Nazi laws to "purify" the public service. On his return to Britain he mobilised colleagues to set up the Academic Assistance Council (renamed the Society for the Protection of Science and Learning two years later), which immediately began to raise funds to help scholars and scientists in Europe who were losing their livelihood, and were at risk of losing their lives.

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13 August 2011
The Times
Nikolaus Pevsner: The Life by Susie Harries by Iain Finlayson

Pevsner, the German émigré writer and architectural historian, gave the English a magisterial postwar sense of their architectural traditions and achievements. He is not to everyone’s taste: throughout his life and after his death in 1983, as a leftist Modernist, he was vehemently opposed by English Romantic right-leaning critics such as David Watkin. 

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11 August 2011
Times Higher Education Supplement
Neither Here nor There by Matthew Reisz

An outsider's perspective can spark innovation, but many refugee academics struggle to rekindle careers.

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01 May 2011
In Touch
CARA, the UK academic community supporting persecuted academics by Kate Robertson

As a UK academic, you would probably find it inconceivable that your career could have lead to your persecution, imprisonment, torture or execution.  See pp. 10-11.

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28 November 2010
Times Higher Education
Friends in need: the Council for Assisting Refugee Academics and Scholars at Risk help to rebuild lives by MATTHEW REISZ

Not much to celebrate at the moment in Baghdad,” May Witwit emailed Bee Rowlatt on 7 December 2006.

“A threat has reached university teachers and students…warning them to stop attending lectures or be classified as enemies and as followers [of the Shia of Iran].”

Ms Witwit was working as a lecturer in English literature at the University of Baghdad, and Ms Rowlatt as a journalist for the BBC World Service.

As the situation in Iraq grew progressively more dangerous, they began to discuss how Ms Witwit and her husband, Ali, could leave."

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04 November 2010
Nature: Vol 468, Issue 7320
Support refugee scientists

The cause of displaced scholars provides a much-needed reminder that intellectual freedom must not be taken for granted. Groups that help them need greater support themselves.

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16 October 2010
Guardian
Letters: Nobel Immigrants by Anne Lonsdale, Council for Assisting Refugee Academics

It is a wonderful vindication of the tradition of academic hospitality in Britain that three out of the four Nobel prizes associated with the UK this year went to academic immigrants (Education, 12 October). They join the many others welcomed who went on to become Nobel winners. CARA has since the 1930s supported 18 who fled from fascism and later attained this distinction. What a magnificent return for Britain's welcome!

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12 May 2010
Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop's CARA lecture

The Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams yesterday delivered a lecture entitled "Enriching the arguments: the refugee contribution to British life" to a large invited audience at the Bloomsbury Theatre, London. 

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06 July 2009
Birkeck Magazine
Freedom of Thought by Laura Wintour

The debt of gratitude Britain owes to various people and organisations, particularly the Council for Assisting Refugee Academics (CARA), for enabling Nikolaus Pevsner to continue his career in Britain, subsequently changing Britain’s attitude to the importance of the built environment and the relationship between architecture, design and daily life. See page 20:

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30 June 2009
OXFORD TODAY
A refuge for the persecuted, release for the fettered mind by Georgina Ferry

Seventy years ago, on 5 February 1939, the great and the good of Oxford poured into the Sheldonian to hear distinguished speakers address 'The Problem of the Refugee Scholar'. The aim was to persuade the University and its colleges to open their hearts ­ and their pockets ­ to academics from countries where fascism had deprived them of their livelihood and of the opportunity to teach and research.

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04 June 2009
Times Higher Education
Asylum and the academy by Margot Finn

Published to mark the 75th anniversary of the foundation of the Council for Assisting Refugee Academics (Cara), Jeremy Seabrook's The Refuge and the Fortress surveys the UK's role as a place of asylum since the 1930s and provides a probing analysis of the challenges faced by scholarly refugees in the globalised 21st century.

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15 March 2009
The Sunday Times
Relative Values: Ben Elton and his father by Caroline Scott

I once read an article in which a psychoanalyst claimed I must be in denial about the kind of hothouse environment I grew up in, simply because my father is a Jewish refugee professor

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02 March 2009
The Telegraph
Help unlock the secrets of a science soirée by Kate Devlin

It was described as the "most dramatic assemblage of brains ever held under one roof" when, in February 1939, some of Europe's most brilliant scientists who had fled the Nazi threat joined with hundreds of their British colleagues at a party to raise money for the refugees.

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09 February 2009
Association of Jewish Refugees (AJR)
The rescue of refugee scholars by Anthony Grenville

Seventy-five years ago, in 1933, the Academic Assistance Council, known from 1936 as the Society for the Protection of Science and Learning, was founded. The AAC/SPSL was a remarkable body that played a unique part in the rescue of scholars and scientists, mostly Jewish, who had been dismissed by the Nazis from their posts at German and Austrian universities and whose livelihoods, and lives, were endangered.

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29 January 2009
Camden New Journal
To a place of greater safety by Illtyd Harrington

NO one in 1935, crossing the busy Southampton Street, took much notice of the young German Jew who seemed fascinated by the colour sequences of the traffic lights. A few years later that man, Leo Szilard, before leaving to take part in the Manhattan Project and helping to make the atomic bomb, told a friend in London he had calculated that there would be a chain reaction to that terrible explosion. This was a more than accurate conclusion after watching the traffic lights.

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15 January 2009
Institute of Race Relations
British handcuffs, the handcuffs of freedom by Jeremy Seabrook

Laurent Mpinde, who was studying sports science in Brazzaville and teaching in schools and colleges, was interviewed for The Refuge and the Fortress: Britain and the Flight from Tyranny commissioned by CARA.

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13 December 2008
The Guardian
REVIEW: The Refuge and the Fortress by John Dugdale

As Jon Snow's foreword notes, exiled professors have given Britain a "vast pool of intellectual capacity", and the first wave of those aided by what is now called the Council for Assisting Refugee Academics (Cara) were a starry bunch, including scientists Max Born, Ernst Chain, Hans Krebs, Max Perutz and Leó Szilárd, architectural historian Nikolaus Pevsner and art historian Ernst Gombrich.

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11 December 2008
Times Higher Education
Bittersweet birthday cheer by Sir John Ashworth

John Ashworth wonders whether Cara's 75th anniversary is really a cause for celebration or a reason for reflection

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11 December 2008
Mature Times
'The Refuge and the Fortress - Britain and the flight from tyranny.' by Jayne Warren

'The Refuge and the Fortress' by Jeremy Seabrook describes the profound and measurable contribution to the life of Britain that refugees have made ever since Hitler forced Jewish academics out of German universities within weeks of coming to power in 1933.

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02 December 2008
The Independent
A gut-wrenching view of the changing face of refugee Britain by Julia Pascal

This well-researched book marks the 75th anniversary of the Council for Assisting Refugee Academics (Cara). It charts British reactions to refugees, from 1915, when passports were required, to the present. While the emphasis is on fugitive scholars, a broader insight is given into those seeking asylum here.

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02 December 2008
University of Cambridge
The Refuge and the Fortress

A launch of The Refuge and the Fortress at St Catharine’s College last Friday 28 November.

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02 December 2008
BookBag
The Refuge and the Fortress: Britain and the Flight From Tyranny

It's the sort of book that should find itself on citizenship reading lists in schools and colleges up and down the land. And perhaps more importantly, also on the desks of newspaper editors and opinion-formers everywhere.

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27 November 2008
Institute of Race Relations
Refuge and fortress: a tale of two cultures by Jeremy Seabrook

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26 November 2008
The Times
They escaped the knock at the door and went on to win Nobel prizes by Jon Snow

An extraordinary group of refugees has deepened Britain's pool of intellectual talent. Their contribution deserves to be celebrated

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03 March 2008
BBC Learning Curve

In CARA's 75th anniversary year, Libby Purvis talks to Sir John Ashworth, CARA President, about its current work and Anna McNamee speaks to the oldest surviving direct beneficiary of CARA's work, Lewis Elton, whose father was a Professor in Prague in 1939; to Richard Gombrich, son of the renowned Austrian-British art historian Ernst Gombrich; and to a former Libyan lecturer who was arrested after she publicly criticised Ghadaffi.  Second item - 19 minutes in.

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29 January 2008
The Guardian
Rescuing Academic Refugees

A British organisation is celebrating 75 years of helping lecturers abused by repressive regimes.

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12 December 2007
Swedish Association of University Teachers
SULF-pristagaren: CARA stöder akademiker som flytt från förtryck

Vi blev oerhört glada över SULF-priset. Vi hoppas att det ska leda till att vårt arbete uppmärksammas i Sverige. CARA behöver stöd från svenska akademiker och akademiska institutioner i arbetet att hjälpa hotade och förföljda akademiker runt om i världen. Det säger professor John Akker som är generalsekreterare för CARA, 'Council for Assisting Refugee Academics', årets mottagare av SULF-priset för främjande av akademisk frihet.

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22 February 2007
Nature
Four years in Iraq: Lives in limbo by Jim Giles

Many Iraqi academics have escaped death threats only to find that their qualifications are obsolete and immigration authorities are unsympathetic. Jim Giles hears their stories.

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12 December 2006
Guardian
Professors in penury by Francis Beckett

Academics are being forced to flee certain death in Iraq - but face a very uncertain life in the UK.

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14 October 2006
Guardian Unlimited - letter
Letter to the editor by John Akker

We believe those in European and America universities should be doing much more to help their fellow academics in Iraq. Through our recently created Cara/Scholars at Risk UK Universities Network, we will be doing just this. We urgently need help and support to ensure that these university staff are assisted in their hour of need, just as in the 20th century with academics from Germany, Hungary, South Africa and Chile.
Professor John Akker
Executive secretary, Council for Assisting Refugee Academics

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26 September 2006
Guardian
Academic asylum by Natasha Gilbert

The Council for Assisting Refugee Academics (Cara) has been helping academic refugees to rebuild their careers in the UK since 1933, when it was launched to aid scholars fleeing fascism in Europe. In recent years, Cara has seen a surge in demand for help, notably from refugees fleeing Iraq, where over 350 academics were killed last year.

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21 March 2006
Guardian
Welcome players by Donald McLeod

A long, painful journey brought Nahro Zagros from classically trained violinist and lecturer in Saddam Hussein's Iraq to playing gigs in Hull with a band called Yorkshire Kurd.  Soon he is off on another journey to Armenia to study the music and culture of the semi-nomadic Yezidis. For, with help from the Council for Assisting Refugee Academics (Cara), Zagros is doing a masters degree in ethnomusicology at York University, researching how music can display cultural identity.

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20 August 2004
Times Higher Education
'I have things to give this country, but I am not allowed to' by Chris Bunting

Persecution has led to a rise in numbers of refugee academics, but they don't feel welcome in the UK. Chris Bunting reports.

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09 October 2001
Guardian
How we survived by Donald McLeod

Last week Professor Lalzad and his family were finally reunited after three bitter years, thanks to the efforts of the Council for Assisting Refugee Academics, a body that was originally founded to help Jewish academics and other victims of the Nazi purges of universities.

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